Grizzly Bear Medicine

May 4-6, 2018
Bethel Horizons Dodgeville, Wisconsin

Grizzly Bear Medicine

The Grizzly Bear

In the kingdom of spirit animals, the bear is emblematic of grounding forces and strength. This animal has been worshiped throughout time as a powerful totem, inspiring those who need it the courage to stand up against adversity. As a spirit animal in touch with the earth and the cycles of nature, it is a powerful guide to support physical and emotional healing.

Bear Meaning

The bear has several meanings that will inspire those who have this animal as totem:

  • The primary meaning of the bear spirit animal is strength and confidence
  • It is a time to take responsibility and set boundaries and learn to honor the boundaries of others
  • Standing against adversity; taking action and leadership
  • The spirit of the bear indicates it’s time for healing or using healing abilities to help self or others
  • The bear medicine emphasizes the importance of solitude, quiet time, rest
  • The spirit of the bear provides strong grounding forces

The bear, a spirit animal
symbolic of strength and courage

The spirit of the bear is a strong source of support in times of difficulty. It provides courage and a stable foundation to face challenges. When the bear shows up as a spirit guide in your life, it’s perhaps time to stand for your beliefs or your truth. This power animal will provide for support and strength.

The bear is also a guide to take leadership in your life or in other people’s lives. This animal is feared and admired for its strength. Its presence inspires respect. Its strength and powerful stature will inspire you to step into a leadership role in your life and take action without fear.

When you invoke the power of the bear totem, reflect on the qualities of inner strength, fearlessness, and confidence in yourself and how you can project them in your world.

The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos ssp.) is a large subspecies of brown bear inhabiting North America. Scientists generally do not use the name grizzly bear but call it the North American brown bear.

Meaning of "Grizzly"

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark first described it as "grisley," which could be interpreted as either "grizzly" (i.e., "grizzled"—-that is, with golden and grey tips of the hair) or "grisly" ("fear-inspiring", now usually "gruesome"). The modern spelling supposes the former meaning; even so, naturalist George Ord formally classified it in 1815 as U. horribilis, not for its hair, but for its character.

Who Should Come

The workshop is designed for people from all walks of life. It is focused towards expanding the awareness of spiritual explorers, healing and shamanic practitioners, and the delightfully inquisitive.

What to Bring

Please bring any rocks or crystals that want to come along. A journal notebook is encouraged as well as any comforts for sitting on the floor, such as floor chairs, back supports, blankets, pillows, etc. Bring lots of grounding stones.

Plan For

We will be in the outdoors of the many sacred energies of Bethel Horizons Camp. Plan for hiking and spending some in nature. Plan to learn to clear your subtle energy field and to adjust it with each moment by being a living, healing presence.

Details

The workshop is residential and will be held at a beautiful Lutheran kids camp at Dodgeville, WI. You will receive detailed directions and a list of what to bring with your registration.

Please include your email with any registration. Suzette will send out registration confirmation. These emails will come from rocksandsouls@gmail.com. Suzette and I will both be able to read any replies.

The fee for the workshop is $545 that is due by May 1st. This includes lodging for Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, a light luncheon on Thursday evening, 3 meals on Friday, 3 meals on Saturday, and brunch on Sunday. There is a fee of $10 for linens and towels or you can provide your own. Class size is limited to 26.

To Register

Please send a non-refundable $100 deposit or the amount in full to Marie Smith, 19126 Campbell Hill Dr, Richland Center, Wi. 53581. We eat gluten free at these workshops and you can preview the menu upon request. All special needs like vegetarian or dairy-free can be honored. I will take names for the waiting list if/when the class fills.

We will begin class at 9am on each day and end at 2pm on Sunday afternoon. If you have questions, please contact Marie Smith at marie@hawkrdg.org or (608) 647-2366.

 


© 2014, One White Horse Standing